This will not be a typical post from me. And no, I’m not a life coach, or any kind of coach.

Credits: whitehotcenter.com

Image credit: whitehotcenter.com

A couple of months back, I attended a pitch even at CCHUB and remarked how entrepreneurs needed to learn presentation skills. As of then, my thinking was that there are many resources out there that local ‘presenters’ could read up and self help. Well, I decided to write up a few tips of my own, when I witnessed a particularly horrible presentation from a guy with a decent product who really should have made a sale on the merit of the product, but lost the pitch on account of an presentation quality.

So here’s my made-for-the market presentation tips for entrepreneurs. How does one make a good presentation in these parts:

Invest in a very sharp suit.

Research shows that good looking people are more likely to be hired at interviews – we can advance that and say sharp looking people get more attention. No, seriously, buy a suit. You have to look the part; look like you belong.

It may not ultimately win your pitch, but you are better off if your audience spends more time admiring the cut of your lapel than getting turned off because you look like you don’t belong with the money you’re pitching for. By the way, this is a $100 problem. If you can’t invest that much in your appearance, you client probably shouldn’t trust you with his money.

If you do invest in that suit, there no need to spoil it by not wearing the right belt – I’ve seen way too many people wear great suits and spoil the picture with a raggedy looking belt or tie. Please don’t. Rather than wear a silly tie, lose the tie completely. It’s in vogue anyway. Sensibly sharp colours are great for ladies, but I’m not sure my style guide is adequate for all genders, so I’ll let that slide.

Invest in non-cheesy ice breakers.

Most people who are coming into presentations where you’re asking for money, or trying to sell a product, come with a prefabricated NO. Your job usually is to turn that no into a yes. A great way to begin your presentation is to warm things up, in order to get your audience to relax. An on-the-spot joke is often a great idea, but of course that joke should be that, a joke. Any icebreaker which reflects negatively on your listener is an unnecessary yellow card. Self deprecating jokes work great if they’re actually funny. Better your audience laughs at you, than at the boss at the head of the table.

Pretty presentations work.

Remember that 100 slide presentation which showed your product idea in great detail, and would leave no doubt in the mind of the audience by the time you’re done? Well, it’s time to ditch it. Spend some time to compress your thoughts into a few slides – go heavy on bullet points, quick data and visual aids. Keep the colors pretty. (I’m a big fan of minimalist presentation slides, and would recommend that everyday.)

That truck load of text your audience really needed to see? Well, that’s why you’re standing out there. Talk. Present.

If it really bothers you, prepare two presentation decks – one for the presentation, and one to give to your audience after you are done.

Keep eye contact. 

Let’s assume you were trying to sell an idea or product. The most important people you would want to talk to are: i) the guy who signs the cheque, and ii) the guys who can influence to get the cheque signed. Identify these people quickly an drake sure you keep your eyes focused on them at least 60% the time. You are not presenting to a room full of people, you are presenting to a few people who need to get you where you want to go. Yes, you need hallelujah moments when you speak to the entire room, but keep your focus on the important people.

Build participation

Remember that marketing book that said the best way to sell is to keep your customer interested? The 1120 pages may have seemed like bullshitting, but they were right. Engage with your audience. Get them to become part of your pitch. Use local illustrations, draw parallels and explain in simple language which allows the audience to go beyond understanding you to seeing your perspective. Use questions and activities to build interaction and engagement.

If your customer, the boss, takes it upon himself to explain part of your product to one of his staff who seems ridiculously slow, or if one of the influencers (remember them?) volunteers to explain to the boss in office vernacular, you are on track.

Keep it sharp

No, a super long, fact laden, stat heavy presentation won’t leave everyone clear about what you have to sell. It’s a little worse than that long deck you were asked to trash. Keep your presentation short and to the point. If anything is going to keep you going for long, it should be your audience asking interesting questions.

Know your stuff

See what I did there? I kept the most important tip of them all for last. And yes, it is what it says. Know your stuff. If you get your sharp suit, break ice really nice, build a colourful deck and kept all the eye contact in the world, without knowing what you’re talking about, you probably should get your butt kicked out of there.

I admit, not every pitch will result in a sale, but if you make a really good pitch, you will definitely get noticed. No, I’m not going to count the number of times we’ve been offered more than our team asked for, or got job offers, on the back of good presentations. Kindly make your own suggestions in the comment section. Thank you.